Archive for February, 2008

Photograph #4

February 29, 2008

Untitled, Lost Hills, CA, 2008
Untitled, Lost Hills, CA, 2008

To request the above photograph:

Send an email (Subject: Photograph #4) to horses [at] horsesthink.com with your name and address.

If you are the fourth person to respond after the posting, you will receive the photograph in the mail.

* This photograph is no longer available.

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Florian Maier-Aichen

February 28, 2008

Florian Maier-Aichen, Untitled (Long Beach), 2004
Florian Maier-Aichen, Untitled (Long Beach), 2004

Speaking of Florian Maier-Aichen, I just realized that there is an interview and slideshow up on Aperture’s website. It’s from last year but worth the read if you missed out on it before.

Read it here.

Photographing The Idea

February 28, 2008

… or should I say photographing the execution of an idea or something like that.

Christopher Williams, Cutaway model Switar 25mm f1.4 AR. Glass, wood and brass. Douglas M. Parker Studio, Glendale, California, November, 17, 2007 - November 30, 2007
Christopher Williams, Cutaway model Switar 25mm f1.4 AR. Glass, wood and brass. Douglas M. Parker Studio, Glendale, California, November, 17, 2007 – November 30, 2007

I saw the current Christopher Williams exhibition at David Zwirner last week and was quite intrigued by many of the photographs on display. I’m not exactly sure what he is trying to say or do all the time but one can’t deny the beauty and curiosity that his photographs seem to offer. The above photograph is part of a larger group depicting dissections of various photographic apparatus. I was curious about how Williams went about making these particular images and asked the lady behind the desk. I was told that Williams hires one specialist to dissect the apparatus and then hires a professional photographer to do the photography. As one can see from the titles, Williams isn’t hiding this fact, the images were made at the studio of one Douglas M. Parker in Glendale, California.

Of course I was surprised to find this out about his work. I guess one way he “gets away” with it is because he’s an “artist” and not just a photographer if you get what I mean. I don’t think it makes the work less interesting to me but it does lead me to think of him as just an “idea” artist, executing his ideas using the medium of photography.

Anne Collier, Crying (2005)
Anne Collier, Crying (2005)

After seeing that exhibition I went over to see the Anne Collier show (now closed) at Anton Kern Gallery. I’m obviously not the only one struck by the similarities between the two artists. Shane makes reference to their similarities but also adds Roe Ethridge into the the mix. I completely see that connection but Ethridge to me seems less deliberate in choosing his subject matter and comes across as more of a searcher/seeker of images, while Williams and Collier both seem to make their images with preconceived ideas or concepts in mind.

Carol Bove, Das Energi, 2005-2006
Carol Bove, Das Energi, 2005-2006

Where as Collier seems to be dealing in a sort of nostalgia and questions of representation not unlike that of Carol Bove (not a photographer), Williams seems firmly rooted in the past via cold and clinical reproductions and constructed realities.

Florian Maier-Aichen, Fan
Florian Maier-Aichen, Fan

With Williams work I’m also reminded of some images by Florian Maier-Aichen of broken objects, dissected objects and recreated logos.

As I said before, I’m not always sure what to make of these sorts of images, but they always seem to intrigue me and stand out somehow. They seem to question many ideas of representation and photography that should interest anyone making images today.

Come to think of it, although still in school and “figuring” it all out, David La Spina’s recent work (both interesting and experimental) somehow fits in to all of this.

David La Spina, Building of Artifacts from History of the Earth
David La Spina, Building of Artifacts from History of the Earth

Getty Sold To Private Equity Firm

February 25, 2008

It’s official, Getty has been sold for approximately $2.4 Billion to Hellman & Friedman.

What they will do with it is anyone’s guess.

Read more about it.

Photograph #3

February 20, 2008

stray_dog1.jpg
Stray Dog, Palm Beach, Aruba, 2007

To request the above photograph:

Send an email (Subject: Photograph #3) to horses [at] horsesthink.com with your name and address.

If you are the third person to respond after the posting, you will receive the photograph in the mail.

* This photograph is no longer available.

Jurgen Teller – W Magazine

February 20, 2008

from Jurgen Teller’s Washington D.C., W Magazine
from Jurgen Teller’s Washington D.C., W Magazine

I’ve never been the biggest Jurgen Teller fan although it seems that most people tend to like his work a lot. I’ve seen gallery shows, museum exhibitions and magazine spreads, but usually I come away feeling unsatiated.

Of course he has made some pretty iconic images, those photographs of Sofia Coppola in the pool come to mind. If anything, it’s the magazine and advertising work that I find most compelling simply because he’s selling products with the pictures but barely acknowledging the product at all. It’s like reverse advertising or something. There is also something to say about Teller as a great graphic designer, his ads for Marc Jacobs have essentially the same layout over and over again.

Sofia Coppola for Marc Jacobs by Jurgen Teller
Sofia Coppola for Marc Jacobs by Jurgen Teller

The other night though I was looking at the February issue of W magazine and found myself entranced by a recent fashion story he did set in Washington DC. I had already seen the issue before and thought nothing of the photographs but all of a sudden they held an interest for me. Of course they are nothing new, but there is a sense of mystery about the images and the light is beautiful even when he is switching back and forth between available sunlight and obnoxious on-camera flash. It works.

I’m not saying that I want to see these hanging in his next gallery exhibition (he’s showing recent images from the Ukraine at Lehmann Maupin right now) but I was happy to discover the spread. Part of it must have something to do with the old school quality of the pictures and the feeling that they might be set in the past and how that relates to what I’m working on right now.

So there you go, we change, our tastes change and we should feel free (dare I say excited) to change. It can be a wonderful thing.

See the complete group of images here.

Film Tickets

February 14, 2008

Waiting on line for Star Wars a few years ago
Waiting on line for Star Wars a few years ago.

The opportunity to purchase advance film tickets online is in my opinion the worst development of the modern movie going experience (that and really bad artificially flavored popcorn).

Seeing a film is not supposed to be like going to the theater or a live concert. Seeing a film should be as easy and accessible as walking into a church and catching a sermon. Seeing a film is supposed to be fun and spontaneous (quite unlike a sermon). I’d prefer to wait in line for an hour before the film than have to purchase tickets in advance online. It seems that you have to wait in line anyway before the movie starts just to get a decent seat. I’d even prefer it if you had to go to the theater earlier in the day to purchase tickets in advance than have to buy them online.

The hardest part about buying movie tickets in advance is gaging whether it’s actually necessary to do so. Even when I know exactly when and where I’m planning to watch a particular film, I rarely make the online commitment to buy the ticket in advance unless it’s a Friday or Saturday night screening or I’m seeing some really hyped up movie (which I really shouldn’t be seeing on opening weekend unless it’s a Friday matinee screening). With new releases it’s understandable that a film can and will sell out, but since the majority of films I see are repertory screenings of old films, I’m usually in the habit of assuming the best possible situation.

The thought process usually goes something like this:

I check the film schedules for the day. I see Tarkovsky’s Mirror is playing Wednesday at Lincoln Center with an early 6:30pm screening time. It won’t be crowded, since the majority of people are still at work. I know it’s raining but how many people are going to trek out in the rain to see an abstract albeit beautiful non-narrative film from 1974? Yeah, but it’s Tarkovsky’s Mirror, one of his masterpieces showing at Lincoln Center (one of the best movie theaters in Manhattan). But it’s Wednesday night, I really don’t need to buy advance tickets.

I go about the day as usual and head to the theater around 6:15 hoping to quickly buy a ticket and get in right before the film starts.

Coming up the escalator, I can already see that I made a big mistake. The line is long, long enough to give birth to a second line, aka the standby line. I wait as the clock ticks by. All the people on the first ticket line have computer print-outs signifying their online ticket purchase. Many of them speak in Russian or have a foreign accent which I assume is Russian. Somehow I get lucky as a woman loudly asks if anyone needs a single ticket. Like an instant reflex I quickly respond and grab it. Inside, the theater is super crowded but I still find an empty seat in a good position. I sit down and the film starts. Shit, I really got lucky.

I wish I knew how to predict with absolute certainty which films will bring out the people and sell out a screening. My radar is pretty good for that but the one thing I tend to underestimate is what I’ll call (for lack of a better term) the “minority group draw.” That’s when you go to see a film from Russia and all the Russians come out to see it. Or when you go to see a film from Israel and all the Israeli’s come out to see it. Or when you go see I’m Not There and all the Dylan fans come out to see it (little do they even know what they are really in for). You get my point. To tell you the truth, I never understood that reason for seeing anything. I’m half Israeli and I speak hebrew but I’ll never automatically see anything just because it came from Israel.

I know I’m stubborn and there’s no solution to the movie ticket conundrum except to give in and buy more advance tickets online, but I’m going to keep making predictions and take the risk. It seems like more fun that way.

Sidney Lumet – Network

February 9, 2008

still from Network by Sidney Lumet, 1976
still from Network by Sidney Lumet, 1976

Sidney Lumet’s 1976 masterpiece Network is kicking off Film Forum’s Lumet retrospective this weekend and will play through Monday.

Network is a prophetic, sarcastic, surreal and twisted tale about an aging network television station willing to do just about anything to increase their viewer ratings including letting a raving lunatic (you be the judge of how crazy Howard Beale really is) deliver the news. Almost everything we see in this film has pretty much proved true in our real world of reality shows and obnoxious talk shows.

network-poster.jpg

Don’t miss this film.

Polaroid Blues

February 9, 2008

The perfect late night video for all our Polaroid blues….

The Beatles At Shea Stadium, 1965

February 7, 2008

This video footage of The Beatles playing the first ever concert at Shea Stadium (first ever stadium rock concert!) is truly amazing and gives quite an accurate feeling of what it must have been like to be there. It certainly put a smile on my face early this morning. Incredible to see that people weren’t even allowed on the grounds in front of the stage, what a shame.

I love it when a female fan responds to a question about The Beatles longevity saying “Well, I wish they’d last forever, they could bring happiness to everybody.”

Also read an informative article in The Times about The Beatles relationship with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who died earlier this week.

(via Brooklyn Vegan)