Archive for June, 2010

Town

June 25, 2010

Copies of Town are now Sold Out.

Town
6.5 x 9.5 inches, 16.51 x 24.13 cm
Perfect Bound, Soft Cover
Color
50 pages
Digital offset
Edition of 100

Here is the book trailer:

The music track accompanying the Town book trailer is an excerpt of Hallogallo by Neu! from their debut album released in 1972.

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The Photographic Project – Town

June 25, 2010

To request the above photographic book:

Send an email (subject: Town) to horses [at] horsesthink.com with your name and mailing address.

If you are the first person to respond after the posting, you will receive the first copy of this book in the mail.

Town
6.5 x 9.5 inches, 16.51 x 24.13 cm
Perfect Bound
Color
50 pages
Soft Cover
Digital offset
Edition of 100

*This book is no longer available.

The Social Network

June 19, 2010

David Fincher’s follow up to The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is The Social Network, a film about the founders of Facebook. The choice of subject matter seems completely out of character but based on the ominous poster above, I’m curious to see what he does with the film.

The Social Network will be released on October 1, 2010.

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The Divine Comedy – Bang Goes The Knighthood

June 18, 2010

The Divine Comedy’s new album Bang Goes The Knighthood was released a couple of weeks ago and we are absolutely loving it at our place, it’s been on constant repeat for at least the past two weeks.

I’m not sure what kind of following Neil Hannon has in the US, but if you are new to his cinematic pop approach, you should check it out. Hannon’s got a gorgeous deep voice, writes witty lyrics and delivers catchy orchestral tunes as well as haunting and romantic melodies.

Assume the Perpendicular is probably my favorite track on the album. If you don’t enjoy that, then you probably won’t like the rest.

Baby Leave

June 14, 2010

This article about women as well as men taking ‘baby leave’ in Sweden is a real eye opener.

Having visited Sweden earlier this year I had the opportunity to meet a young couple who had just had their first child. The mother took the first year off from work to raise the child and continued getting paid what I think was 80% of her salary. After that, the plan was for the father to take off 10 months of paid leave to raise the child while the mother went back to work.

I don’t ever see something like this happening in the USA but if it did, we would be on our way to living in a civilized world with real values. Here mothers are lucky when they get one month of paid leave and fathers get nothing.

YouTube + The Guggenheim =

June 14, 2010

YouTube Play is a collaboration between YouTube and the Guggenheim Museum to unearth and showcase the very best creative video from around the world. To have your work considered, simply post it on YouTube, and then submit it at youtube.com/play. A jury of experts will decide which works presented at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York on October 21, 2010 with simultaneous presentations at the Guggenheim museums in Berlin, Bilbao, and Venice. The videos will be on view to the public from October 22 through 24 in New York and on the YouTube Play channel.”

Submissions close July 31, 2010.

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Sigmar Polke, 1941-2010

June 11, 2010

Sigmar Polke, Strand, 1966

Sigmar Polke always seemed to be the more playful and funny artist, especially in comparison to Gerhard Richter’s detached and conceptual approach, but that doesn’t mean his work is any less powerful or memorable.

His near-constant experimentations in painting, drawing, printmaking and photography will continue to inspire.

Read Roberta Smith’s obituary in the Times and then more about Polke and his artistic legacy over at the Tate.

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Eaton S. Lothrop, Jr. Photographic Collection

June 10, 2010

Collapsible Hand Camera, French, 9 x 12cm

This has to be one of the craziest collections of cameras I have ever seen. I’ve never seen or heard of at least 75% of these contraptions. And supposedly this is only Part I of the collection.

Las Vegas Studio: Images from the Archives of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown

June 9, 2010

Las Vegas strip, 1966
© Venturi Scott Brown and Associates Philadelphia

I wish I could be in Los Angeles before June 20th as that’s the last day to see Las Vegas Studio: Images from the Archives of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown on view at Moca’s Pacific Design Center. Looks like a wonderful exhibition not to be missed.

Stardust Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas, 1968
© Venturi Scott Brown and Associates Philadelphia

From the press release:

“In 1968, American architects Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, and Steven Izenour, together with students from Yale University, made the city of Las Vegas the object of their study. Their findings, published in the 1972 book, Learning from Las Vegas, are legendary, extending the categories of the ordinary, the ugly, and the social into architecture. Offering great insight into the creation of this groundbreaking publication, Las Vegas Studio: Images from the Archives of Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown presents original research materials from the archives of Venturi Scott Brown Associates, including over 80 photographs and a selection of films shot during the authors’ research that were a crucial aspect of their architectural study.”

Dawoud Bey's Commencement Remarks

June 4, 2010

” Making art has never been—as far as I know—the safest or easiest career choice. It’s one thing to do this when you are very young without any real responsibilities to shoulder and another to make a serious commitment to this as a vocation rather than an avocation. So it should go without saying that making art is a real act of faith. And your faith is about to be seriously tested once you leave here. Now I have not come here today to make you any more nervous about your possible futures than you might already be. Rather I want to encourage you to believe that your work not only should continue, but that it is imperative and that it needs to exist in the world. You each need to continue to believe that your work matters and that through your work you have the ability to change and reshape the world one person or one viewer at a time and to continue to expand your own sense of who you are in the process.”

Dawoud Bey, speaking at Yale University School of Arts Commencement, 2010

Dawoud Bey’s commencement speech is a good read for anyone graduating from art school this year but I would encourage artists long out of school to read it as well. His words are a great reminder of the dedication and perseverance it takes to continue being an artist.

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